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Ordinance No. G-2837 New Sirens

Friday, January 19 2018 2:59 PM

(PUBLISHED IN THE ANTHONY REPUBLICAN ON JANUARY 24, 2018)

 

 

ORDINANCE NO. G-2837

 

AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING AND PROVIDING FOR THE ISSUANCE OF $43,500 PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS, SERIES 2018, OF THE CITY OF ANTHONY, KANSAS; PROVIDING FOR THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF AN ANNUAL TAX FOR THE PURPOSE OF PAYING THE PRINCIPAL OF AND INTEREST ON SAID BONDS AS THEY BECOME DUE; AUTHORIZING CERTAIN OTHER DOCUMENTS AND ACTIONS IN CONNECTION THEREWITH; AND MAKING CERTAIN COVENANTS WITH RESPECT THERETO.

 

 

 

            WHEREAS, the City is a city of the second class, duly created, organized and existing under the Constitution and laws of the State; and

 

            WHEREAS, pursuant to K.S.A. 65-163d through 65-163u, as amended, and other provisions of the laws of the State of Kansas applicable thereto, by proceedings duly had, the governing body of the City has authorized the following improvements (the "Improvements") to be made in the City, to-wit:

 

Project Description

Res No.

Authority

Amount

Siren upgrades

G-2836

K.S.A. 12-110c

$78,500

 

            WHEREAS, the City has received a commitment from the United States of America, acting through the Department of Agriculture - Rural Development ("RD/USDA") to purchase the City's general obligation bonds in an amount of $43,500, the proceeds of which, together with a portion of a United States Department of Agriculture/Rural Development Grant expected in the amount of $35,000 (the “Federal Grant”), will be used to fund the Improvements, all pursuant a letter of conditions dated May 16, 2017; and

 

            WHEREAS, the governing body of the City is authorized by law to issue general obligation bonds of the City to pay the costs of the Improvements; and

 

            WHEREAS, none of such general obligation bonds heretofore authorized have been issued and the City now proposes to issue $43,500 of its general obligation bonds to pay the costs of the Improvements.

 

            NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE CITY OF ANTHONY, KANSAS, AS FOLLOWS:

 

            Section 1.   Definitions of Words and Terms.  In addition to words and terms defined elsewhere herein, the following words and terms in this Ordinance shall have the meanings hereinafter set forth.  Unless the context shall otherwise indicate, words importing the singular number shall include the plural and vice versa, and words importing persons shall include firms, associations and corporations, including public bodies, as well as natural persons.

 

            "Act" means the Constitution and statutes of the State including K.S.A. 10-101 to 10-125, inclusive, K.S.A. 10-620 et seq., K.S.A. 12-101 et seq., all as amended and supplemented from time to time.

 

            "Bond and Interest Fund" means the Bond and Interest Fund of the City for its general obligation bonds.

 

            "Bond Resolution" means the resolution to be adopted by the governing body of the City prescribing the terms and details of the Bonds and making covenants with respect thereto.

 

            "Bonds" means the Issuer's General Obligation Bonds, Series 2018, in the aggregate principal amount of $43,500, and dated as of the Dated Date, authorized by this Ordinance.

 

            "City" means the City of Anthony, Kansas.

 

            "Clerk" means the duly appointed and acting Clerk of the City or, in the Clerk's absence, the duly appointed Deputy Clerk or Acting Clerk.

 

            "Dated Date" means February 1, 2018.

 

            “Federal Grant” means funds received from the United States of America, acting through RD/USDA, pursuant to a letter of conditions dated May 16, 2017.

 

            “Improvements” means the improvements referred to in the preamble to this Ordinance.

 

            "Mayor" means the duly elected and acting Mayor or, in the Mayor's absence, the duly appointed and/or elected Vice Mayor or Acting Mayor of the City.

 

            "Ordinance" means this Ordinance authorizing the issuance of the Bonds.

 

            "Owner" when used with respect to any Bond means the Person in whose name such Bond is registered on the Bond Register.

 

            "Paying Agent" means the State Treasurer, and any successors and assigns.

 

            "RD/USDA" means Rural Development, United States Department of Agriculture.

 

            "State" means the State of Kansas.

 

            Section 2.   Authorization of the Bonds.  There shall be issued and hereby are authorized and directed to be issued the General Obligation Bonds, Series 2018, of the City in the principal amount of $43,500, for the purpose of providing funds to: (a) pay a portion of the costs of the Improvements; and (b) pay costs of issuance of the Bonds.

 

            Section 3.   Security for the Bonds.  The Bonds shall be general obligations of the City payable as to both principal and interest from ad valorem taxes which may be levied without limitation as to rate or amount upon all the taxable tangible property, real and personal, within the territorial limits of the City.  The full faith, credit and resources of the City are hereby irrevocably pledged for the prompt payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds as the same become due.   

 

            Section 4.   Terms, Details and Conditions of the Bonds.  The Bonds shall be dated and bear interest, shall mature and be payable at such times, shall be in such forms, shall be subject to redemption and payment prior to the maturity thereof, and shall be issued and delivered in the manner prescribed and subject to the provisions, covenants and agreements set forth in the Bond Resolution hereafter adopted by the governing body of the City.

 

            Section 5.   Levy and Collection of Annual Tax.  The governing body of the City shall annually make provision for the payment of principal of, premium, if any, and interest on the Bonds as the same become due by levying and collecting the necessary taxes upon all of the taxable tangible property within the City in the manner provided by law.

 

            The taxes above referred to shall be extended upon the tax rolls in each of the several years, respectively, and shall be levied and collected at the same time and in the same manner as the general ad valorem taxes of the City are levied and collected, shall be used solely for the payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds as and when the same become due and the fees and expenses of the Paying Agent.  The proceeds derived from said taxes shall be deposited in the Bond and Interest Fund.

 

            If at any time said taxes are not collected in time to pay the principal of or interest on the Bonds when due, the Treasurer is hereby authorized and directed to pay said principal or interest out of the general funds of the City and to reimburse said general funds for money so expended when said taxes are collected.

 

            Section 6.    Further Authority.  The Mayor, Clerk and other City officials are hereby further authorized and directed to execute any and all documents and take such actions as they may deem necessary or advisable in order to carry out and perform the purposes of the Ordinance, and to make alterations, changes or additions in the foregoing agreements, statements, instruments and other documents herein approved, authorized and confirmed which they may approve, and the execution or taking of such action shall be conclusive evidence of such necessity or advisability.

 

            Section 7.   Governing Law.  This Ordinance and the Bonds shall be governed exclusively by and construed in accordance with the applicable laws of the State.

 

            Section 8.   Effective Date.  This Ordinance shall take effect and be in full force from and after its passage by the governing body of the City, approval by the Mayor and publication in the official City newspaper.

 

 

MEET AND GREET

Friday, December 1 2017 11:19 AM

MEET AND GREET

The City of Anthony would like to invite you

to a meet and greet to get to know the new

City Administrator, Paul Southwick

Please join us on

Friday, December 1, 2017

4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

in the

City Commission Room

124 South Bluff, Anthony, KS

15th Anniversary 9-11 Memorial Service

Thursday, August 25 2016 4:29 PM

15th Anniversary 9-11

Memorial Service

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Kansas 9-11 Memorial

Anthony, KS

 

1st Responder March from Anthony Fire Department………………………………….........................................................…….4:30 pm

The Salina Police Department Honor Guard and the Wichita Caledonian Pipes & Drums will lead.

All First Responders, Fire Depts., Law Enforcement, EMS, Dispatch & Military Welcome to march.

 Free BBQ served by Anthony Fire Department…………………...........................………………..............................………………..5:30 pm

Music in the park by Melanie Ryan……………………….........................................................………………………………………….….5:30 pm

Memorial Service……………………………………………………..........................................................……………………..…………………..7:00 pm

Special Guest Speakers: ….........................................................…Col. Roger D. Murdock, Chief of Staff, Kansas National Guard 

                                                                                                       Captain Joe Huber, FDNY/Bronx & Lt. James Beltrami FDNY/Queens

 Also performing will be the Wichita Caledonian Pipes & Drums and

Eric Kerschen & Chaparral High School Singers

 Bring your lawn chairs and come join us for food, fellowship, music and remembering those who lost their lives on

September 11, 2001

 We Have Not Forgotten; We Will Not Forget; We Will Always Care;

September 11, 2001

 Memorial Service Sunday Morning

September 11th

7:46 a.m.

Kansas 9-11 Memorial


   In case of bad weather the memorial service and BBQ will be at the Municipal Hall.

 

 

City of Anthony Consumer Confidence Report - 2016 Covering Calendar Year - 2015

Monday, May 16 2016 1:42 PM

CITY OF ANTHONY                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Consumer Confidence Report - 2016 Covering Calendar Year - 2015

This brochure is a snapshot of the quality of the water that we provided last year. Included are the details about where your water comes from, what it contains, and how it compares to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state standards. We are committed to providing you with information because informed customers are our best allies. If you would like to observe the decision-making process that affect drinking water quality, please call TERRY STARK at 620-842-5960.

Your water comes from 5 Ground Water Wells.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as those with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) included rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in sources water before we treat it include: Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, livestock operations and wildlife. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.

Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as storm water run-off, agriculture, and residential users.

Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or the result of mining activity.

Organic contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and also come from gas stations, urban storm water run-off, and septic systems.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulation which limits the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. We treat our water according to EPA's regulations. Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

Our water system is required to test a minimum of 2 samples per month in accordance with the Total Coliform Rule for microbiological contaminants. Coliform bacteria are usually harmless, but their presence in water can be an indication of disease-causing bacteria. When coliform bacteria are found, special follow-up tests are done to determine if harmful bacteria are present in the water supply. If this limit is exceeded, the water supplier must notify the public.


 

Ihvanntent et 11411111 and Envinmmeni

Water Quality Data

The following tables list all of the drinking water contaminants which were detected during the 2015 calendar year. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate the water poses a health risk. Unless noted, the data presented in this table is from the testing done January 1- December 31, 2015. The state requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, is more than one year old. The bottom line is that the water that is provided to you is safe.

Terms & Abbreviations

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): the ''Goal" is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to human health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): the "Maximum Allowed" MCL is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL): recommended level for a contaminant that is not regulated and has no MCL.

Action Level (AL): the concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements.

Treatment Technique (TT): a required process intended to reduce levels of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL1: the highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Non-Detects (ND): lab analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present. Parts per Million (ppm) or milligrams per liter (mg/I)

Parts per Billion (ppb) or micrograms per liter (pg/l)

Picocuries per Liter (pCilL): a measure of the radioactivity in water. Millirems per Year (mremlvr): measure of radiation absorbed by the body. Monitoring Period Average (MPA): An average of sample results obtained during a defined time frame, common examples of monitoring periods are monthly, quarterly and yearly.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU): a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person. Turbidity is not regulated for groundwater systems.

Running Annual Average (RAA): an average of sample results obtained over the most current 12 months and used to determine compliance with MCLs.

 

Testing Results for: CITY OF ANTHONY

Microbiological                       Result                                    MCL                                               MCLG          Typical Source

No Detected Results were Found in the Calendar Year of 2015

Regulated Contaminants

Collection Date

Your

Highest Value

Range (low/high)

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

ARSENIC

1/5/2015

1.6

1.6

ppb

10

0

Erosion of natural deposits

BARIUM

1/5/2015

0.11

0.11

ppm

2

2

Discharge from metal refineries

CHROMIUM                       I

1/5/2015

2.4

2.4

ppb

100

100    I

Discharge from steel and pulp mills

FLUORIDE

1/5/2015

0.28

0.28

ppm

4

4

Natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth.

NITRATE

10/21/2015

5.3

4.4 - 5.3

ppm

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use

SELENIUM

1/5/2015

3.4

3.4

ppb

50

50

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Disinfection Byproducts

Monitoring Period

Your Righest AA

Range (low/high)

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

TOTAL HALOACETIC ACIDS (HAAS)

2015

3

2.7

ppb

60

0

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

2015

12

12

ppb

80

0

By-product of drinking water chlorination

 

Lead and Copper

Monitoring Period

90th Percentile

Range (low/high)

Unit

AL

Sites Over AL

Typical Source

COPPER, FREE

2013 - 2015

0.19

0.018 - 0.21

ppm

1.3

0

Corrosion of household plumbing

LEAD

2013 - 2015

3.1

1.2 - 4.6

ppb

15

0

Corrosion of household plumbing

 

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Your water system is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Radiological Contaminants

Collection Date

Your Highest Value

Range (lowlhigh)

Unit

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source

COMBINED RADIUM (-226 & -228)

1/5/2015

1,7

1.7

PCl/L

5

0

Erosion of natural deposits

 

Secondary Contaminants

Collection Date

Our Highest Value

Range

(low/high)

Unit

SMCL

ALKALINITY, TOTAL

1/5/2015

290

290

MG/L

300

CALCIUM

1/5/2015

97

97

MG/L

200

CHLORIDE

1/5/2015

130

130

MG/L

250

CONDUCTIVITY @ 25 C UMHOS/CM

1/5/2015

1100

1100

UMHO/CM

1500

CORROSIVITY

1/5/2015

0.35

0.35

LANG

0

HARDNESS, TOTAL (AS CACO3)

1/5/2015

350

350

MG/L

400

MAGNESIUM

1/5/2015

25

25

MG/L

150

PH

1/5/2015

7.5

7.5

PH

8.5

PHOSPHORUS, TOTAL

1/5/2015

0.033

0.033

MG/L

5

POTASSIUM

1/5/2015

1.9

1.9

MG/L

100

SILICA

1/5/2015

21

21

MG/L

50

SODIUM

1/5/2015

92

92

MG/L

100

SULFATE

1/5/2015

57

57

MG/L

250

ZINC

1/5/2015

0.0083

0.0083

MG/L

5

During the 2015 calendar year, we had violation(s) of drinking water regulations. Additional Required Health Effects Language:

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, you should ask for advice from your health care provider.

Please Note: Because of sampling schedules, results may be older than 1 year.

The water quality report is posted at www.anthonykansas.org or contact us for a copy

9 airports to receive funding under Kansas Airport Improvement Program

Friday, April 22 2016 8:51 AM

Eisenhower State Office Building 700 SW Harrison Topeka, KS 66603

                   Kansas                                     Department of Transportation

phone: 785-296-3585 fax: 785-296-0287 wvw.ksdot.org

Mike King, Secretary                                                                                   Sam Brownback, Governor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 21, 2016

News contact: Steve Swartz (785) 296-3585; cell (785) 221-5615; steveswMsdot.org

9 airports to receive funding under

Kansas Airport Improvement Program

Nine airports have been selected for funding under the second phase of the 2017 Kansas Airport Improvement Program.

The projects selected for the Kansas Department of Transportation program include runway improvement, fuel system installation, taxiway construction and more. The nine airport sponsors, which must provide a funding match ranging from five to 50 percent, will receive a total of $2.7 million in KAIP funding for projects costing an estimated $3.1 million.

"KAIP has not only funded key improvements at local airports, it has helped create a statewide aviation network that enhances both the health and economic well­being of the entire state," said KDOT's Director of Aviation Merrill Atwater.

Applications for KAIP funding regularly exceed available funds and this year was no exception. KDOT received 114 applications for projects totaling $38.7 million. Earlier this year under phase one of the fiscal year 2017 program, 12 projects were selected for $2.25 million of funding.

Communities selected for phase 2 funding and the amount requested include: Anthony — Extend runway, $990,000

LaCrosse — Repair runway, $607,433

Lyons — Install Automated Weather Observation System III, $103,500

Wakeeney — Runway modernization (lighting, striping, signage), $441,000


Stafford — Land acquisition for development, $27,075

Herrington — Construct airport fence, $21,000

Rose Hill-Cook Field — Relocate fuel system, construct ramp, $208,250

Lawrence — Reconstruct taxiway C, $154,800

Pleasanton — Install fuel system, $191,250


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